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SWERY 65

Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut—The Official Visual Companion Review

Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut—The Official Visual Companion Screenshot

I'm certain there's a great story to be told about the troubled six-year development of Deadly Premonition, and I'm even more certain that this interactive guide isn't the place to find it. It does, however, offer a degree of insight into the mindset of the man behind its madness, Hidetaka "Swery" Suehiro, and in places is every bit as esoteric as the game itself.

Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut Second Opinion

First Glances, Second Chances

Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut Screenshot

HIGH "Let's re-release Deadly Premonition!"

LOW "Let's add a ridiculous story bit that confuses Joe Gamer even more!"

WTF "Let's charge for DLC when the game is almost exactly the same!"

Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut Review

Have You Seen the Special Editions, Zach?

Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut Screenshot

HIGH Wow, the fighting controls are now on par with Silent Hill from 10 years ago!

LOW Not one technical flaw has been fixed. The framerate is worse.

WTF Who thought adding a terrible framing device was a good idea?

Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut Preview / Interview with Hidetaka "Swery" Suehiro

Deadly Premonition's Hidetaka "Swery" Suehiro

Just like Handel, the digital craftsman Hidetaka Suehiro seems equally excited, baffled, and reluctant to continue work on his most successful game yet, Deadly Premonition—a game that, dare I say it, could be a similarly-praised work hundreds of years from now. The game is being re-released this March as a PlayStation 3-exclusive entitled Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut. I was lucky enough to be able to sit down with the man and his producer, Tomio Kanazawa, last week to discuss the details. It was an event that was sometimes as intentionally mysterious as the goings-on in the game's fictional hamlet of Greenvale, but thrilling nonetheless.

Dan's Unsurprising Ten for 2010

Deadly Premonition Screenshot

It's the beginning of the new year, which means it's time to look at the high points offered by last year's games. So, without any further ado, let's get listing!

Deadly Premonition.

That's it. Play it ten times.

How Games Should—And Shouldn't—Be Designed (Deadly Premonition is the Game of the Year, Part 11)

Deadly Premonition Screenshot

I have been accused of being a chauvinist for the cause of Deadly Premonition—that my love for the game eclipses any ability to think critically about its flaws. I don't believe this is the case, and I'm happy to admit it that the game is loaded with flaws.

The Benefits of Virtual Carpooling! (Deadly Premonition is the Game of the Year, Part 10)

Deadly Premonition Screenshot

In the last article I skipped over yet another fascinating detail of the game's story, but not without cause. I've previously discussed just how voluminous the game's supplemental material is, and how it's profoundly worth it for the player to take the time to fully explore Greenvale—there's one problem with it, however. In order to see everything, the game absolutely must be played twice.

The Squirrel Detective (Deadly Premonition is the Game of the Year, Part 9)

Deadly Premonition Screenshot

I've already talked about some of the moments that captivated me during my first run through Deadly Premonition, now I'd like to cover the first moment that really made me question my initial assumption that I was playing a brilliant subversion of video game tropes—the last moment during which I doubted Deadly Premonition's intentions (if not its execution—there would be plenty of doubt left to come on that front).

Getting to Know You, Greenvale (Deadly Premonition is the Game of the Year, Part 8)

Deadly Premonition Screenshot

Information control is one of the most vital components of storytelling—deciding when and how your audience gets pieces of information can be almost as important as the details of the information itself. This is yet another place where Deadly Premonition breaks ranks with videogame convention. If the player is strictly following the storyline there's a proscribed time and place for York to meet all of the town's denizens. If, however, York and Zach decide that getting to the police station and starting the plot isn't a priority, then the the two of them are free to meet almost all of the game's characters at their own pace.

Interview with SWERY 65 (Hidetaka Suehiro), Director of Deadly Premonition

Deadly Premonition Screenshot

Whether you're a fan or not, the fact is that Deadly Premonition has made quite a splash, and eliciting such a response doesn't happen with just any title. Clearly, the director is onto something here, and the goal is to find out what. So, without further ado, here are twelve questions with SWERY 65.

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