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Weird

Typing of the Dead

Game Description: Typing of the Dead blends horror with a typing tutorial for an original gaming experience. There are several game modes to help you become a terrific typist. Drill mode focuses on different skills, such as typing speed, accuracy, reflex, and special keystrokes. In the boss mode, your battle against each boss emphasizes a different skill, from quick reading and answering to story reading and typing. Two-player modes include cooperative and competitive.

Typing of the Dead – Consumer Guide

According to the ESRB, this game contains: Animated Blood & Gore, Animated Violence

Typing of the Dead – Review

If there was ever any doubt that Sega was the leader in video-game innovation, the string of games bursting with fresh ideas released during the current Dreamcast generation will surely lay any such fears to rest. Has there ever been such a wide variety of techniques, approaches or just plain whacked-out, kooky ideas from one publisher? I really don't think so.

Typing of the Dead – Second Opinion

I'm all for quirky games with unique ideas, but one thing that Brad and other game reviews for Typing Of The Dead don't emphasize enough is that aside from the typing action, Typing Of The Dead is virtually identical to House Of The Dead 2! I went into this game expecting an entirely new game based on the House Of The Dead universe.

Seaman Review

Seaman Screenshot

Seaman isn't a game in the traditional "command and conquer" sense. Seaman is a somewhat passive experience best described as part digital pet and part conversational simulator, but 100 percent strangeness.

Seaman Second Opinion

Seaman Screenshot

Seaman is a tough game to review. Since the overwhelming majority of titles released these days are rehashes of games that have been done time and time again, a rare gem brimming with originality is something to be cherished. Overall I found it to be a very worthwhile and interesting experience that has never really been done before. On the other hand, Seaman isn't really a "game," so I'm sure that a title like this isn't going to be to everyone's liking.

Seaman

Game Description: The latest—and undoubtedly strangest—in a line of virtual-pet games, Seaman will have you mothering (or fathering) the most surreal creature yet to grace the Dreamcast: a fish, known as Seaman, with a human face. Drop some Seaman eggs into your virtual aquarium and watch them hatch into larvae, then baby Seamen (no giggling please), and eventually into adults. In order to raise happy, fulfilled Seamen, you'll need to do more than just feed them and regulate their water temperature and oxygen levels—like most pets, they need your regular attention. You interact with the little guys as a disembodied hand that can tap on the glass of their aquarium, tickle them (they love that), and drop things into their tank. Seaman also comes with a microphone; you can talk to your critters. Voice-recognition software built into the game will enable your tiny mermen to learn your voice and, in time, hold conversations with you. In fact, these Seamen are notoriously moody and may even make fun of you at times. If you neglect them, they will definitely let you know!

Space Channel 5 – Review

And so it pleases me greatly to see that in Sega's latest music/rhythm genre release, Space Channel 5, 'sexiness' isn't something the game merely wears on its sleeve, but rather something that is ingrained into the very fabric of the gameplay. Most of Space Channel 5's sex appeal is attributed to one thing—or, rather, character—its knockout bombshell of a protagonist, appropriately named Ulala (pronounced Ooh-la-la).

Space Channel 5 – Consumer Guide

According to ESRB, this game contains: Mild Animated Violence, Suggestive Themes 

Space Channel 5

Game Description: Meet Ulala (pronounced ooh-la-la), a rookie reporter assigned to cover a breaking dance news story. Pudgy dancing aliens (resembling futuristic gummy bears) have beamed down and are zapping human inhabitants into an offbeat dance step. More than just watch from the sidelines, Ulala must free fellow earthlings from the spell by matching the aliens' dance moves step for step. Unlike when playing previous move-memorization games such as Simon and Concentration, players of Space Channel 5 will need to feel the rhythm—the tempo, pauses, and idiosyncrasies of the beat—as well as the sequence of steps to get it right.

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